Large Medieval Spearhead

A beautiful example of a late medieval long-necked socketed spearhead, dating from c. 11th- 15th centuries AD.

 

The spearhead is British found and consists of a finely worked leaf-shaped blade which tapers to a very narrow neck. The socket is long and closed, containing a single attachment hole. It’s easy to imagine this graceful weapon mounted on a long shaft of ash or maple and wielded by one of our Norman or Plantagenet forbearers.

 

As with many spearheads (and arrowheads) of the high to late medieval period, it is very difficult to date the artefact unless they are found in context (i.e., with other artefacts that can be dated). The manufacture and typology of medieval spearhead changed little over many centuries, therefore only a broad approximation of this spearhead's age can be given.

 

The spearhead is in fine condition, having been professionally cleaned and preserved. Framed and hand finished in ash. Outer dimensions are c. 56cm x 33cm

Provenance

Acquired by Timeless on the UK Antiquities market, 2017. Formerly in the private collection of a London gentleman. Details of the dealer can be provided on request.

 

Arrowhead 1:

Forged some time between the 11th and12th centuries, the large, leaf-shaped blade and long tang suggests that this is a type T2 (Jessop, Medieval Arrowhead Typology, 1997), and would almost certainly have had a military origin.

 

Arrowhead 2:

 

Timeless are pleased to offer a fantastic arrowhead of the high medieval period.

 

Forged some time between the 12th and13th centuries, the small, ogival-shaped blade and long tang suggests that this is a type T2 (Jessop, Medieval Arrowhead Typology, 1997), and would almost certainly have had a military origin.

Provenance

Acquired by Timeless on the UK Antiquities market, 2018.

Medieval Arrowheads

Viking Heavy Spearhead

A beautiful example of a thousand-year-old iron Viking Large Socketed Spearhead, or 'Heavy Spear'.

 

The lentoid sectioned leaf-shaped blade, open socket and lack of a ‘ferrule’ (a split along the length of the socket) suggests it was forged in continental Europe, rather than Britain which had a large Viking population at the time. Many of these spearheads come from pagan burials (as grave goods) or as votive offerings, being bent or broken for ritualistic purposes and offered as sacrifices to the Norse gods.

 

The Heavy Spear was a larger version of the Viking 'Aesc', or Long Thrusting Spear, and was common in Scandinavia.

Provenance

Acquired by Timeless on the UK Antiquities market, 2018. Formerly in the private collection of a Kent Lady; formerly part of her grandfather's collection acquired in Germany after WWII, thence by descent.

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