Large Medieval Spearhead

A beautiful example of a late medieval long-necked socketed spearhead, dating from c. 11th- 15th centuries AD.

 

The spearhead is British found and consists of a finely worked leaf-shaped blade which tapers to a very narrow neck. The socket is long and closed, containing a single attachment hole. It’s easy to imagine this graceful weapon mounted on a long shaft of ash or maple and wielded by one of our Norman or Plantagenet forbearers.

 

As with many spearheads (and arrowheads) of the high to late medieval period, it is very difficult to date the artefact unless they are found in context (i.e., with other artefacts that can be dated). The manufacture and typology of medieval spearhead changed little over many centuries, therefore only a broad approximation of this spearhead's age can be given.

 

The spearhead is in fine condition, having been professionally cleaned and preserved. Framed and hand finished in ash. Outer dimensions are c. 56cm x 33cm

Provenance

Acquired by Timeless on the UK Antiquities market, 2017. Formerly in the private collection of a London gentleman. Details of the dealer can be provided on request.

 

Arrowhead 1:

Forged some time between the 11th and12th centuries, the large, leaf-shaped blade and long tang suggests that this is a type T2 (Jessop, Medieval Arrowhead Typology, 1997), and would almost certainly have had a military origin.

 

Arrowhead 2:

 

Timeless are pleased to offer a fantastic arrowhead of the high medieval period.

 

Forged some time between the 12th and13th centuries, the small, ogival-shaped blade and long tang suggests that this is a type T2 (Jessop, Medieval Arrowhead Typology, 1997), and would almost certainly have had a military origin.

Provenance

Acquired by Timeless on the UK Antiquities market, 2018.

Medieval Arrowheads

Viking Heavy Spearhead

A beautiful example of a thousand-year-old iron Viking Large Socketed Spearhead, or 'Heavy Spear'.

 

The lentoid sectioned leaf-shaped blade, open socket and lack of a ‘ferrule’ (a split along the length of the socket) suggests it was forged in continental Europe, rather than Britain which had a large Viking population at the time. Many of these spearheads come from pagan burials (as grave goods) or as votive offerings, being bent or broken for ritualistic purposes and offered as sacrifices to the Norse gods.

 

The Heavy Spear was a larger version of the Viking 'Aesc', or Long Thrusting Spear, and was common in Scandinavia.

Provenance

Acquired by Timeless on the UK Antiquities market, 2018. Formerly in the private collection of a Kent Lady; formerly part of her grandfather's collection acquired in Germany after WWII, thence by descent.

Megalodon Shark Tooth

The giant prehistoric shark, Carcharodon megalodon, was an incredibly successful apex predator that dominated the world’s oceans in the Miocene and Pliocene epochs 23–2.6 million years ago. Evolved from the earlier giant shark, Otodus obliquus — a type of ancient mackerel shark that grew larger than a great white — the Megalodon’s huge size (over 60’ in length) was probably a result of the evolution of large sea-going mammals during the Eocene.

 

Like most sharks both extinct and extant, the Megalodon regularly shed its teeth as they became worn or damaged. This particular tooth is over 4” from root to tip, with a beautiful tan-blue enamel and clear serrations. Framed in tulip wood and sympathetically finished in a Tudor oak wax, this fossil would make a great talking point in any home.

Provenance

Acquired by Timeless on the UK fossil and mineral market, 2017. Originally discovered in North Carolina, USA.

Medieval Broadhead

This frame contains a hand-forged, British-found broadhead iron arrowhead dating from the 13th century A.D. The arrowhead is of type MP 7 (Jessop, Medieval Arrowheads Typology, 1997) and may have been used for either hunting or warfare.

 

Socketed medieval arrowheads are typically British-made. When used in battle, the arrowheads would be very loosely attached to the shaft with wax. This would prevent the arrows from being shot back, as the head would remain in whatever it had hit.

 

We can never know whether this arrowhead was used as a hunting implement or a weapon of war – but whoever owned it, and however it was used, it remains a timeless treasure.

Provenance

Acquired by Timeless on the UK antiquities market, 2019.

Fossil Fish Display

There are places in the world where the presence of fossils makes them very special.

 

The Jurassic Coast in southern England, for example, can be considered the birthplace of palaeontology. Similarly, the bone fields of the Gobi Desert, Australia’s Ediacara Hills, the stunning window into Cambrian life that is Canada’s Burgess Shale – all are iconic fossil bearing locations and well known to anyone with an interest in ancient life.

 

However, in terms of sheer abundance of fossils, few places can rival the Green River Formation on the Great Plains of Utah, Wyoming and Colorado. The chances are that if you collect fossils, at least one of your collection will come from this rock formation.

 

Formed 50 million years ago from three huge freshwater lakes, the rocks of Green River consist primarily of fine-grained sandstones and mudstones – perfect for preserving the fine detail of the animals that lived and died there in the early Eocene epoch.

 

This beautiful example of a well-known Green River Formation fish is now available in the Timeless Galleries. The species’ full name is Diplomystus dentatus– first discovered by the famous palaeontologist Edward Drinker Cope in 1877. 

Provenance

Acquired by Timeless on the UK Fossil and Mineral market, 2019.

Fossil Fish Display

There are places in the world where the presence of fossils makes them very special.

 

The Jurassic Coast in southern England, for example, can be considered the birthplace of palaeontology. Similarly, the bone fields of the Gobi Desert, Australia’s Ediacara Hills, the stunning window into Cambrian life that is Canada’s Burgess Shale – all are iconic fossil bearing locations and well known to anyone with an interest in ancient life.

 

However, in terms of sheer abundance of fossils, few places can rival the Green River Formation on the Great Plains of Utah, Wyoming and Colorado. The chances are that if you collect fossils, at least one of your collection will come from this rock formation.

 

Formed 50 million years ago from three huge freshwater lakes, the rocks of Green River consist primarily of fine-grained sandstones and mudstones – perfect for preserving the fine detail of the animals that lived and died there in the early Eocene epoch.

 

This beautiful example of a well-known Green River Formation fish is now available in the Timeless Galleries. The species’ full name is Priscacara liops – a type of ancient predatory perch, often found in 'mortality plates' where many individuals died together, suggesting that P. liops was a shoaling fish.

 

Sympathetically framed without glass in hand-finished aged gold, the outer frame measures c. 60cm x 49cm

Provenance

Huge Viking Spearhead

A beautiful example of a thousand-year-old iron Viking Long Thrusting Spearhead.

 

This very large hand-forged spearhead is comprised of a slender lozenge-sectioned tapering blade and a flared socket. The lack of a ferrule (a split along the length of the socket) suggests it was forged in Britain which had a large Viking population at the time. Many Viking spearheads come from pagan burials (as grave goods) or as votive offerings, being bent or broken for ritualistic purposes and offered as sacrifices to the Norse gods.

 

The Viking Long Thrusting Spear, also called ‘aesc’ (pronounced ‘ash’), probably developed from boar spears, and were associated with the wealthy, such as a thegns, eldormen and earls.

 

Mounted on a custom-made oak plinth, the spearhead measures 45cm in length.

Provenance

​Acquired by Timeless on the UK Antiquities market, 2019. Formerly the property of a European collector, prior to that in an old collection formed in the 1980s

Acquired by Timeless on the UK Fossil and Mineral market, 2019.

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