Bronze Age Short Sword

Timeless are pleased to offer a a beautifully preserved Bronze Age short-sword, dating from the 2nd millennium B.C.E.

 

The sword was cast in the Greek or near Middle-Eastern Aegean region a century or two before the Trojan war. As with many swords of this era, the blade is triangular, and the hilt is so short that it could be gripped by only three fingers ­– the thumb and forefinger gripping a blunted, thickened section of the blade termed the ricasso.

 

Whilst the discovery of alloyed copper was a huge leap in mankind’s development, bronze itself is a relatively malleable metal. There are surviving accounts of Bronze Age battles in the Near East where the swords would bend after only one or two strikes – the warriors then having to stop fighting and straighten the blades with their feet.

 

Warfare in the Bronze Age was largely conducted with spearmen and supported by archers, as both these weapons use far less metal than a sword. Bronze weaponry was expensive to produce, and only the wealthy could afford to arm themselves with swords. It is likely, therefore, that this sword was passed down from father to son for many generations.

Provenance

Acquired by Timeless in 2017 on the specialist UK antiquities market, formerly acquired on the London art market prior to 1980.

Huge Celtic Spearhead

This enormous Celtic spearhead was hand-forged to produce a lentoid-section willow-leaf blade which is typical of the Iron Age. Furthermore, the long neck broadens to a socket with a ferrule, indicative of British provenance.

 

Many of these spearheads come from pagan burials (as grave goods) or as votive offerings, buried for ritualistic purposes and offered to long-forgotten Celtic gods. This enigmatic weapon has been professionally preserved to conserve the 2000-year-old iron blade

Provenance

Acquired by Timeless on the UK Antiquities market, 2018. Formerly in the private collection of a gentleman formed prior to the 1980s.

Huge Celtic Spearhead

This enormous Celtic spearhead was hand-forged to produce a lentoid-section willow-leaf blade which is typical of the Iron Age. Furthermore, the long neck broadens to a socket with a ferrule, indicative of British provenance.

 

Many of these spearheads come from pagan burials (as grave goods) or as votive offerings, buried for ritualistic purposes and offered to long-forgotten Celtic gods. This enigmatic weapon has been professionally preserved to conserve the 2000-year-old iron blade

Provenance

Acquired by Timeless on the UK Antiquities market, 2018. Formerly in the private collection of a gentleman formed prior to the 1980s.

Bronze Age Spearhead

A beautifully preserved Middle Bronze-Age Spearhead with an excellent provenance, dating from around 1500 B.C.E.

 

The British Bronze Age produced a number of ‘artefact types’ which are often unearthed by metal detectorists and archaeologists alike. Axes, being extremely robust, are often found, ranging from the early flat axes to the beautifully decorated late Bronze Age socketed axes.

 

However, the discovery of a Bronze Age Spearhead is always a special moment. These rare artefacts can be surprisingly delicate, with thin blades and small loops that somehow survive over 3500 years of ploughing and soil cultivation.

 

This lovely example has a small, pear-shaped (or pyriform) blade and a tapered socket which was holed by the craftsman to receive two securing studs, now lost to antiquity.

Provenance

Acquired by Timeless in 2018 on the specialist UK antiquities market, formerly forming part of the A. Cotton collection, New Forest, Hampshire. Formed in the 1970s.

Bronze Age Axe